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Global Warming Rules
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2010

Read how the various legislative and regulatory Pieces Fit Together in regulating green house gases

There are a lot of different approaches to regulating greenhouse gases floating around. Here’s how they all fit.

International Treaties

Kyoto — Adopted in 1997, but never signed by the U.S. Participating countries (mostly Europe and Japan) agreed to cut emissions by 7% below 1990 levels by the year 2012. A useful learning tool for the next international Treaty, Copenhagen.

Copenhagen — Originally intended to be the next major treaty, with participation by both developing and developed countries, and longer range, more aggressive cuts in greenhouse gases. Meetings are still underway as this is written.

National Legislation

American Climate and Energy Security Act — Cuts emissions 14% by 2030. Passed House of Representatives in June. Stalled in the Senate.

Clean Energy Jobs and American Power Act — Senate version cuts emissions 17% by 2030.

Note: both bills include significant subsidies for coal and nuclear.

Agency rules

EPA Finalizes Endangerment Finding — Under the Clean Air Act, EPA can set rules to limit emissions if it finds that a pollutant “endangers” health or the environment. On December 7, EPA finalized the finding that carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases represent a significant threat to public health and welfare. If no treaty is signed and Congress fails to act, the EPA rules could be developed to limit emissions for autos and major industrial sources.

What You Can Do:

Contact Senators Byrd and Rockefeller and ask them to support strong climate legislation. Ask them to work to improve the bill by maintaining strong EPA oversight, cutting subsidies for coal and nuclear, and supporting aggressive requirements for energy efficiency and renewables.

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